Advice That Can Help You Get Better At Organic Gardening

 

The activity of organic gardening is so much more than just placing a seed into the ground. It takes a great deal of research, hard work and patience, to help your plants grow and mature so that you can partake of their bounty. The tips below can help you improve your organic gardening skills.

If you live in the city, you can still reap the benefits of organic gardening through container gardening. Herbs especially will thrive in indoor pots, as long as they are large enough. Container gardening can be easier than outdoor gardening when going organic, as there is less risk of exposure to insect pests or weeds.

One of the best ways to be successful at organic gardening is to plan early. The best laid out plans for an organic garden, always make for the most successful garden. Plan what you will plant early on and be sure to have back-up vegetables ready to plant when short-lived plants, like lettuce and spinach, are done for the year.

Integrate low-growing strawberries into your yard’s landscape. Instead of setting aside fruit plants in a separate area, choose strawberries, such as alpine varieties, to use a ground cover that doubles as a fruit garden. These spreading, low-growing plants look attractive and grow well in areas that have a lot of sun.

When planting your organic garden, spacing is an important thing to keep in mind. Leave a little more space than you think your full grown plant will need to make up for overgrowth. Your plants will need the space not only because of their physical size, but also because the space will provide air circulation for the garden. Therefore, ensure that you allow for ample spaces between your seedlings.

A great tip when opening up your own organic garden is to mist your mix with a spray bottle. If you do not have a spray bottle, then set your trays in water. This is needed so that your mix will get the proper amount of moisture from below the surface.

If you are serious about organic gardening, you must start with organic seed. Organic seed comes from fruits and vegetables that have not been treated by any chemicals, nor can they be from fruits or vegetables that have been genetically modified in any way. Organic seed can be more expensive than non-organic, however, it is an investment you will only need to make once for most standard garden plants, since you harvest your own produce and then save the seeds for your next planting.

When starting your organic garden, don’t forget to plant companion plants. Companion plants are like very friendly neighbors. They can enrich the soil and keep pests away from your other plants. By planting them together, you can avoid the use of harmful pesticides or artificial fertilizer products.

When starting an organic garden look into natural pesticides. It is a healthy way to be sure you do not lose a great deal of your crop to insects while working to keep your environment safe. There are many pesticides that were once used and are really effective.

To make sure you have strong seedlings, look deeply. After planting tomatoes, for example, you must closely monitor the soil for the first signs of green shoots. Don’t get attached–these hints of green are hiding an underdeveloped root system below the surface of the soil. These starts will suck the resources from your seedlings for several weeks, inhibiting their growth.

Clean the fallen foliage from your organic garden regularly. Strive to walk through your garden at least once a week and pick up dead leaves. Dead leaves are like a great big welcome sign for disease and harmful bacteria. Removing them from your garden will help prevent the need for pesticide use.

Keep kitties looking for a bathroom out of your garden with natural deterrents such as black pepper and orange peels. You can also cover the ground around your plants with chicken wire, or purchase a pack of inexpensive wooden chopsticks and poke them in the ground haphazardly. These ideas can protect your vegetables and herbs from being contaminated by toxoplasmosis, a parasite that can be especially harmful to pregnant women.

To keep your garden organic, be sure that any seeds you buy are authentic, high quality organic seeds. Check to make sure that the seed company has been certified organic and does not sell any genetically modified seeds. There are a growing number of sources for organic seeds, so shop around.

Collecting and recycling rain water is a great way to save money and help your garden bloom. Rain water is generally cleaner and freer of pollutants and contaminants than ground water or city water. Collect the rain in rain barrels or cisterns so that you can use it whenever it is needed.

If you find yourself battling annoying clumps of weeds, one solution is to use a concentrated spritz of water and vinegar to the most choked areas. Adjust the nozzle on the sprayer so that it is easier to target only the affected areas. This is most effective when used on a sunny day.

The activity of organic gardening is one that can be enjoyed by everyone, but only those very serious into it, will try to perfect their organic gardening techniques. Now with more organic gardening knowledge to add to your “bag of tricks,” you can easily become a great organic gardener, too.

How To Properly Grow An Organic Garden

Many people see organic gardening as a way to contribute to the safe-keeping of our beautiful planet. For others it presents the opportunity to put nutrient-rich and chemical-free food on the table. Both are laudible reasons. Whatever your reason is, you may find that these suggestions really help.

When starting your organic garden, a great tip is to figure out which vegetables you should pick to plant in your garden. Some vegetables are better suited for home germination than others are. Some great vegetables to consider planting include broccoli, cabbage, cauliflower, lettuce, peppers, onions, tomatoes, basil, and more.

It is possible to grow an organic garden all year if you have a sufficient light source for an indoor garden. Plants need plenty of light in order to grow properly and there are bulbs that can be purchased to provide indoor gardens with the appropriate amount of light to have them thrive and produce a fruitful bounty.

To keep air flowing through your compost pile, stand a large PVC pipe with punched holes in the center of your pile so the air flows up and down the pipe, and then through the holes directly into the pile. The air movement helps your soil decomposers create the heat needed to jumpstart the decay process.

Make easy work of washing your organic produce with a laundry basket. As you pick your produce, lay them in a plastic laundry basket, which works as a strainer. Hold the hose over the top and the water can make quick work of rinsing all the dirt and other matter off of your fruits and veggies.

Plant ornamental, edible plants as part of your regular yard landscaping. Good plants to start with include rosemary, thyme varieties, sages, oregano and basil. These all look great mixed with perennials, and they will supply you with enough that you won’t need to purchase them anymore – herbs are expensive at the supermarket.

Make liquid fertilizer from your compost. By adding a little bit of water to the biological decay, you can harvest the nutrient rich concoction and spread it on your plants in an efficient way. By fermenting the compost with about an equal amount of water can give you a great form of liquid fertilizer that will help promote growth without negative side effects or toxic run-off.

Plant synergistically. To naturally repel pests, plant marigolds near nematode-sensitive crops like tomatoes and potatoes. To improve growth, plant legumes near plants that can benefit from the nitrogen they produce. Intersperse pungent plants like herbs and onions, whose scent can repel bugs and animals, with other unscented vegetables.

One odd but apparently useful tip for growing organic plants, is to lightly brush your plants with your fingers or a piece of cardboard 1-2 times a day. While it might sound strange, research has shown that this method can increase the size of your plants.

Add vines to your landscape. You can get a wide range of plants that are vines. Some ornamental, and some fruit or vegetable varieties. Vines can grow up most fences or structures. Use them to create more interesting landscapes in your yard. Have them grow up an awning, and create shade for you.

To rid your organic garden of bugs, try using a mixture of dish soap and water. Mix 2 tablespoons of dish soap into a gallon of water. Use a spray bottle to spray the foliage and soil around the plants. Before spraying your whole garden or even a whole plant, test the effect of the mixture on a few leaves and wait a few days before doing the rest.

Change your garden beds every year. Planting the same type of plant in the same area of your garden each year can cause disease or encourage fungus growth. The diseases and fungi are harbored in the soil and are ready to make a comeback each year. By mixing things up and planting in various spots, you will be able to keep disease and fungus at bay.

If you are trying to grow tomatoes from seed, use old drink cups or yogurt containers to start them. When they are ready to be transplanted, just cut the bottom off of the cup and put them right into the ground. This will help protect the new plant from worms and other pests.

Cover bare spots when you plant. When you put a new plant into your organic garden, do not leave the earth bare where you planted. Make sure you mulch the area all around your new plant. This will protect it while it begins to grow. It will also keep the ground moist.

When determining what you would want to plant in your garden, you should be as specific as possible. Different varieties of a particular flower or vegetable require different types of environments. As an example, take the beautiful rose bush. There are hundreds of variances available and while some will do well in your garden, others won’t. Know your specific surroundings and what will thrive there.

If you use an open compost pile to mix and build your garden compost material, place it in an area that is not too near your garden. It is best to leave at least six feet of open area between the compost pile and your garden. Planting your garden too close to the compost pile, where it can come in contact with immature compost, can cause your plant roots to be damaged.

The above list should have provided you with a some good ideas on becoming an even better organic gardener. It’s great that you have such an interest in the subject. Going organic is ‘green’; it is healthy, and it is enjoyable!